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March News From Fairway Green

March News From Fairway Green

Lawn Care News March 2016 Check out the latest from Fairway Green, below! Moss  Moss has been a major topic of discussion with property owners the past two years.  This could be contributed to the above normal rainfall for the past two years along with other site conditions conducive for moss development.  Mosses generally do… Read more »

Lawn Care News March 2016

Check out the latest from Fairway Green, below!


Moss growth due to shade and poor soil drainage.

Moss growth due to shade and poor soil drainage.

Moss 

Moss has been a major topic of discussion with property owners the past two years.  This could be contributed to the above normal rainfall for the past two years along with other site conditions conducive for moss development.  Mosses generally do not kill grass.  However, it will take over areas in the lawn where turf is thin and unable to grow.  Conditions that create moss are excessive shade, poor draining and or compact soils, excessive moisture, and in some cases, very low pH levels. It is possible to have one or more of these conditions that contribute to a moss issue.  These conditions create a poor growing environment for quality turf.

Moss growing on driveway.

Moss growing on driveway.

 

There are several products on the market that will kill/burn back moss.  However, if the conditions that created the moss in the first place are not addressed, the moss will return.  Chemical control is a temporary fix and will not stop moss from returning.  Changing the conditions creating moss, if possible, is the only way to permanently eliminate it. 

 
 


Moles 768px-Mole_tunnel

Mole activity tends to increase this time of year because the soil has more moisture and is easier for the moles and voles to move around.  Think about how difficult it is to dig a hole on your property in July and August.  Mole control can be frustrating and time consuming.  Many people believe that a grub treatment will rid their lawn of moles.  However, trying to control moles by controlling grubs is usually ineffective because moles feed heavily on earthworms and other insects.  We now have chemical options to control Moles in North Carolina.  Several products are now registered for use in our state.  Fairway Green does not offer a mole/vole control service at this time.  However, North Carolina now has a few Mole control products available that offer satisfactory results. The two products that people have had success with are Talprid from Bell Laboratories and Motomco, Mole Killer. These products should be available in most home & garden centers in your area. A very good website for additional information on Moles and Voles is http://themoleman.com/


Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control

Crabgrass.

Crabgrass.

Time is running out to control summer Crabgrass. Crabgrass will usually start to germinate in late March or early April throughout the Transitional Zone. Germination will occur when soil temperatures are between 53 to 58 degrees and 3 to 4 inches deep. Crabgrass germination will be seen first in bare spots with little desirable turf and in full sun. January is the time of year when lawn care professionals will apply your first application of Pre-emergent Crabgrass control. It is imperative that this first application is applied by early March. The required second application of pre-emergent will usually follow in about 6 to 8 weeks.  


Large Patch Fungus

Large Patch Fungus in spring.

Large Patch Fungus in spring.

Large Patch fungus can be active on Zoysia, Bermuda, Centipede and St. Augustine in spring and fall. Fairway Green is seeing more cases of this disease every year in our area.  Large Patch Fungus is a damaging disease on Zoysia, Bermuda, Centipede and St. Augustine turf in the fall and early spring. This disease is similar to Brown Patch Fungus on Fescue.  Large Patch Fungus needs to be controlled with two applications of fungicide in the spring and fall when ground temperatures are between 50 and 70 degrees. Damage occurs before you are aware you have it and is not visible until green-up in the spring. Preventative Fungicide in the fall and early spring is the only way to control this disease.

 


If you have questions about your lawn care services, or would like to request a free estimate, please contact Fairway Green today! We are happy to help you achieve the beautiful lawn you deserve!