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May News from Fairway Green

May News from Fairway Green

Lawn Care News May 2015 Check out the latest from Fairway Green, below! Brown Patch Fungus Brown Patch Fungus activates within a distinct set of climatic parameters.  Brown Patch will activate when the temperatures are above 75 degrees with high atmospheric moisture.  This moisture can be in the form of rainfall, irrigation or humidity.  Brown… Read more »

Lawn Care News May 2015

Check out the latest from Fairway Green, below!

Brown Patch Fungus

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Brown Patch Fungus activates within a distinct set of climatic parameters.  Brown Patch will activate when the temperatures are above 75 degrees with high atmospheric moisture.  This moisture can be in the form of rainfall, irrigation or humidity.  Brown Patch fungus can be devastating to the lawn.

Signs of Brown Patch will be an off color similar to drought stress, lesions on the leaf blade or browning of the turf in circles or areas.  The easiest way to identify Brown Patch is to stand away from the lawn and look for a shadow appearance.  Once you identify the area of concern, look at the leaf blades of the plant for tan or brown lesions on the leaf blade.  If you see these lesions, more than likely, you have Brown Patch.  Drought stress can be mistaken for Brown Patch.  Drought stress will make the leaves fold at the center giving the leaf blade a straw appearance.

Applying fungicides preventively offers better control and less turf damage vs. curative fungicide. We typically see Brown Patch starting in Fescue in mid-May through August.


Poa Annua

Poa

We have received many inquiries on this grassy weed. Poa annua (Annual Bluegrass) is an annual grass that is most noticeable this time of year because of the large amount of tan colored seed heads the plant is producing now.  Poa annua ends its life for this year in Late May and June.  It is a prolific seeder and seed is generally viable the following year.  It typically grows in areas that have poor compact soil and where your desired turf is thin or nonexistent.


Spring Grub Season

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White grubs are the larvae of Scarab beetles.  There are several beetles that produce the grubs we see while digging in our lawns and natural areas.  Grubs species in North Carolina include Southern and Northern Chafer, Japanese, Asiatic, Green June and the May beetle.  Grubs are identified by their cream, off white colored, body and off brown color hind part and head.  Grubs have six legs and are from ¼ to 1½ inches.  They are often seen in their C-shaped position in the soil.

White grubs create damage in turf by eating the root system of the host plant.  Turf damage is usually observed in late spring through fall with an off color, wilting appearance. Many times it is misdiagnosed as disease, heat or drought stress.  The lawn may have a spongy almost loose feel to the soil under the turf.  In severe cases, the turf may roll up when tugged on from the lack of roots holding it to the soil.  Activity from birds, raccoons, skunks and moles could indicate a grub infestation.  To determine the extent of grub activity and the need for control, you will need to use a spade to remove the upper 3 inches of soil in a 12” x 12” area.  Cut back the turf sample to count the number of grubs and inspect root damage.  If nine or more grubs are observed, take immediate action utilizing proper products for situation.  All turf types are susceptible to grub feeding and damage.


Update on warm season turf winter injury/damage:

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We are seeing more injury on warm season turf again this year from winter damage.  There appears to be more Bermuda injury/damage this year compared to last.  Bermuda turf has the ability to recover and fill in faster compared to Zoysia and Centipede.   Centipede appears to have the most severe damage again this year.  Zoysia appears to have some injury but we will know more as it continues to come out of dormancy this month.  Most warm season turf didn’t completely break dormancy and green up till early June in 2014.

 

If you have questions about your lawn care services, or would like to request a free estimate, please contact Fairway Green today! We are happy to help you achieve the beautiful lawn you deserve!